Freedom and equality

Read Rothbard's introduction.

Freedom and equality

A stable and just society requires precepts and standards that its members accept, which become the framework within which those members can live their lives in an honest and productive manner.

A fundamental principle was enunciated centuries ago by thoughtful men who were concerned with the dignity and worth of the individual — a principle that can provide those very precepts and standards. It is the Principle of Equal Freedom.

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This book was written to help carry that principle forward, to expand upon the implications of the principle, and hopefully to convince others to adopt the principle as the foundation of their lives. A free society needs a foundation on which to evaluate actions and expectations.

A strong, Freedom and equality principle makes the best foundation, a foundation that remains constant across the years.

With such Freedom and equality foundation, people can go about their lives knowing what is expected of them and what they can reasonably expect of others.

Where the foundation is a principle, a society and its people have the greatest freedom and flexibility in adapting to the inevitable changes that life brings.

In contrast, a coercive society is controlled by a massive set of arbitrary laws, most of which are in place to favor certain factions in the society. These laws strongly constrain the lives of people and rigidify the society, reducing their ability to adapt to changing conditions.

Freedom and equality

The arbitrary laws and social rigidity assure that freedom, justice, and peace are generally unobtainable within the society. Freedom requires no justification; no appeals to nature, deity, or other sources are needed.

Search Mises Daily A stable and just society requires precepts and standards that its members accept, which become the framework within which those members can live their lives in an honest and productive manner. A fundamental principle was enunciated centuries ago by thoughtful men who were concerned with the dignity and worth of the individual — a principle that can provide those very precepts and standards.
The United States Declaration of Independence, adopted incontains the following statement:

People can have freedom whenever they establish it for themselves and defend it. In the world as it is today, the moment that defense stops, freedom is lost. Once lost, it is very difficult to regain. Societies can exist and function well without institutional coercion and fraud.

They can provide freedom for their people and well-being beyond any that can be achieved when liberty is compromised. Free societies do not provide all of the features of contemporary life: Their people would have to learn how to get along without those features of primitive civilization.

No society and no government now on Earth have a clear principle underlying their functioning to fully protect the individual. Very few individuals have a clear principle to guide their actions and define their ethics. Most of what guides individuals is what their parents, teachers, and religious leaders told them when they were children, modified a bit by experience.

Freedom, Inequality, Primitivism, and the Division of Labor

The premise of this book is that things sociological work better and provide more justice when a clear, moral principle is in place. The history of sociological work on the best form of society is filled with assumptions that have not always stood up under close scrutiny.

Those assumptions have included premises such as: This work is concerned with the latter premise, that individual freedom should prevail. This is in stark contrast with contemporary society where the State prevails while granting a few protections to its subjects.

The Possibility of Freedom Freedom is about liberty and property, but, moreover, it is the elimination of coercion and fraud as social institutions. A free society cannot have coercion and fraud as social institutions.

Over three hundred years ago, John Locke wrote on equal freedom, property, and upholding natural law: Gustave de Molinari showed in how private companies could provide that protection of lives and properties. Our knowledge of how free societies could be established and maintained has advanced substantially since then.

In particular, we know how free societies can be protected from assaults ranging from street muggers to attacks by coercive government.Liberté, égalité, fraternité (pronounced [libɛʁte eɡalite fʁatɛʁnite]), French for "liberty, equality, fraternity", is the national motto of France and the Republic of Haiti, and is an example of a tripartite motto.

By defining equality in terms of individual rights*, equality can not undermine freedom. However, variations in freedom between individuals can undermine equality. Freedom is a state of being, a right granted by society to act according to one's desire within the rules set forth by that society.

Freedom and Equality is an engaging examination of who we are as ethical beings and an explanation of why we behave the way we do when confronted with value regardbouddhiste.coms: 1. By defining equality in terms of individual rights*, equality can not undermine freedom.

However, variations in freedom between individuals can undermine equality. Freedom is a state of being, a right granted by society to act according to one's desire within the rules set forth by that society.

Jan 20,  · Today marks only the 17th time that America has celebrated an official holiday in remembrance of Martin Luther King Jr. Perhaps in a hundred years, this will be . In a democracy, de Tocqueville argued, Americans would ultimately favor equality over freedom, because its material benefits are more immediate and tangible.

Not so, countered the late political.

Freedom, Inequality, Primitivism, and the Division of Labor | Mises Institute